Overcoming Writer’s Block

July 28, 2014 by · 6 Comments 

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Writer's blockHi, I’m Jim and I’m a full-time freelance writer.

I’ve been writing since the mid ’90s, and writing professionally since 2000. I have written nine books, fiction and nonfiction, and all but one have been published by major publishing houses.

I have a confession to make.

I struggle with crippling writer’s block. In fact, I fight the battle against writer’s block every single day. Most days, when I think about getting started on my writing projects for the day, I get cold chills. We’ve all heard the cliche about the blocked writer staring at a blank page (or screen) for hours.

I don’t do that. As a rule, I don’t even get that far.

You see, if I stared at a blank screen, it would be obvious that I need to write. Instead, I dress up my writer’s block by trying to appear productive.

I check e-mail obsessively, because I never know when someone might write me, wanting me to help them write a book, or a proposal, or whatever.

I visit Facebook (just to check on important writing matters, you know).

I read blog posts on my Feedly reader so that I can stay up with all my writing friends and on current issues.

I check several news sites because it’s important to stay up on world events. There might be a book out there, just waiting to be written.

If I’m not careful, I soon find myself in an endless loop, circling from website to website to website, feeling incredibly busy, but not getting anything accomplished.

So why am I telling you this?

Struggling with writer’s block (or creative block for you musicians and artists), is an annoying and frustrating problem for anyone, no matter where you are in your professional development.

But for someone who is a full-time freelancer, it is far more than an annoyance.

For the full time freelancer, writer’s block can be a career killer. It can be devastating.

In my ongoing battle against writer’s block, I’m going to be writing down some observations, techniques, helpful hints, books, and whatever else I’m finding that helps.

Because I know one thing for sure. I’m not the only artist who suffers from creative block. Hopefully, I’ll be able to share some things that will help. If nothing else, at least I’ll be writing.
*****

Join the discussion: What about you? Do you suffer from writer’s block? What do you do to defeat it?

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Why You Need to Keep Writing

February 21, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

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BlindSightCaffey_LoResAre you discouraged? Keep writing.

You never know what God might do with your words.

In the late ‘90s I wrote Blind Sight, a suspense novel about a man who was struggling with God’s goodness in tragedy. Near the end of the book my protagonist, a man who lost his wife and two children in a car accident, understands that God is good even when circumstances are not.

Like all new authors, when Blind Sight was released in 2003 I had dreams of a bestseller. But that wasn’t to be. The book’s sales were mediocre at best and, when my second royalty statement showed massive returns—and a large deficit—I was crushed.

I pouted for a few weeks, but eventually realized that I was being selfish. Finally I prayed, “Lord, I wrote this book for you and I’m giving it back to you. If you’ll use it in even one life, I’ll be happy.”

Time passed and Blind Sight was consigned to the ranks of out-of-print books.

But God wasn’t finished with it.

On March 1, 2008, a terrible tragedy happened not far from where I live. Two men broke into the home of Terry and Penny Caffey. They shot Terry, Penny, and their two sons. Then they set the house on fire. Even though he’d been shot five times at point blank range, Terry survived and managed to escape the burning house. Terry’s wife and sons died. Even worse, his teenage daughter Erin was implicated in the crime.

Although Terry was a Christian, he struggled deeply in the aftermath of the tragedy. He couldn’t understand why God took his family or why He made him go on living.

About six weeks after the murders, Terry went back to his property to “have it out with God.” He stood on the ashes of his house and cried out, “God why did you take my family? I need an answer and I need it today.”

At that moment, he saw a brown, scorched piece of paper leaning against a tree. Terry picked it up.

It was a single page from my novel. But it wasn’t just any page. It was the page where my protagonist—a man who has lost a wife and two children—comes to grips with God’s sovereignty in his loss.

The first words on the page were, “I couldn’t understand why You would take my family and leave me to struggle along without them…but I do believe You’re sovereign. You’re in control.”

God used the words on that burned page to turn Terry Caffey’s life around. He forgave his daughter and the others who were involved in the murders, and even lobbied to have the death penalty taken off and now he travels all over the country sharing an incredible story of grace and forgiveness.

God also used that page to change the direction of my writing.

In January of 2009, Terry asked me to help him write a book that would tell his story.

I hadn’t written or published in four years and collaboration was not in my long-term plans. However, because I wanted to encourage Terry, I agreed to help him write a book proposal.

Because of the intense media interest in Terry’s story, Tyndale snapped up the proposal and put the book on an accelerated publication schedule. We signed a contract in March of ’09 and the book was set for a September release.

I had to write it in twelve weeks.

The accelerated writing schedule was probably a good thing, because I didn’t have the time to give in to sheer panic. I’d never collaborated before and I had no earthly idea how to go about it. But it was a door that God had opened, and so I trusted Him for the wisdom.

I dusted off my little digital voice recorder and began interviewing Terry. Then I worked at outlining the book, selecting the stories that would go into it, even using my fiction-writing skills to lay out a plot-line.

As I worked with Terry and wrote what would become Terror by Night, I began to notice something unexpected.

I was enjoying myself immensely.

I love telling stories, but I had no idea how much I would enjoy helping other people tell their stories.

And so now I happily call myself a collaborator. I spent most of 2011 writing a book about Nate Lytle, a young surfer who made a miraculous recovery from a massive traumatic brain injury. I also collaborated on a novella with bestselling author Stephen Arterburn. And I’ve got proposals in the works for two more collaborations, one fiction and the other nonfiction.

I never intended to be a collaborator.

But God led me through an unexpected door and down an unplanned path. And in doing so, He changed the direction of my writing ministry.

Has God placed some unexpected doors or unplanned paths before you? I hope you’ll take a chance and go through them.

You never know what God might do.

“A person plans his course, but the Lord directs his steps,” (Proverbs 16:9, NET Bible). 

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